Mersive Solstice

Immersive art

2 min read

Large-scale, immersive projection can provide a visually explosive perspective compared to looking at just a flat screen.  Displays that wrap the user in information are fairly uncommon and usually found in industries that make critical decisions about massive data (yes, there are displays that look similar to the immersive dome used by Professor X.)

Immersive artOur customers are a great example  — ranging from geophysitsts looking for the next great energy reserve, to designers collaboratively visualizing cloth patterns for NYC Fashion Week.  Of course, Mersive wasn’t founded to only support the world’s top decision centers and collaboration rooms; I believe displays have far more promise to change the way we communicate with one another in almost every setting.  That’s why I’m always excited to see immersion being used to convey beauty, music and emotion. A great recent example is 720 degrees.

Immersive artThis installation by Ron Arad uses 3D projection mapping to create a large immersive theater. The spherical structure stands 26 feet tall and consists of 5,600 silicon cords suspending from a metal frame. The end result is a truly immersive multimedia “curtain” that presents screenings of video art and films.  Visitors can simply open any portion of the curtain and step inside the circle to watch from the interior. Mersive powered a display at InfoComm this year in the BenQ booth that created a 340-degree display, which was really impactful. This takes it up a notch, allowing visitors to also view the art from outside of the curtain walls and across the museum campus, hence the aptly named “720 degrees.”

Congratulations to Ron Arad for combining technology, artisitc vision and his audience to create a truly new communicative experience.

Leave a Comment

More posts like this

This is What Disruptive Looks Like

4 min read

Read Post

The Isolated Worlds of Video Conferencing

4 min read

Read Post

A Futurist’s Guide to InfoComm

8 min read

Read Post